Tech blog

  1. Benefits of a Desiccator Cabinet

    Benefits of a Desiccator Cabinet

    Why Choose Desiccator Storage?

    As critical components become smaller and more sophisticated, their susceptibility to moisture damage increases.

    Once absorbed by sensitive components, water creates a number of potentially disastrous conditions. Even minute traces of oxidation, the most notorious result of moisture exposure, can degrade soldering and other manufacturing processes. Because water dissolves ionic contaminants, it also alters the conductivity of the material, which in turn can degrade electrical function. Water also combines with other materials, causing harmful chemical reactions that degrade pharmaceutical samples and chemical mixtures.

    "Popcorn Effect": Moisture Damage in IC Production

    One particularly costly example of moisture-related damage is the "popcorn" effect that occurs during reflow soldering of IC pac

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  2. Why choose a Terra desiccator?

    Why choose a Terra desiccator?
    Compare Terra's Advanced Designs and Fabrication Experience

    At first glance, most desiccators look pretty similar. It's not until you put them into service—and fill them with delicate, expensive parts—that differences in quality become apparent.

    When you invest in a Terra desiccator cabinet, you benefit from 40 years of design innovation and manufacturing experience. Simply put: Terra desiccators function better and function longer.

    Doors
    The First Failure Point of a Desiccator Cabinet - Terra's full 304 stainless steel door frames offer the strongest door construction in the industry {{dav_id_a4_alt_ta
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  3. A Finishing Station for Your 3D Printing Projects

    A Finishing Station for Your 3D Printing Projects

    Additive manufacturing (AM), commonly called 3D printing, isn’t just for rocket scientists anymore. Its use has increased exponentially as companies and researchers discover useful applications and innovative methods. Availability of equipment and supplies for performing three-dimensional printing is becoming almost commonplace; it’s just a matter of time before retailers start to offer 3D printing services, or a few mavericks begin to do it in their homes (broken coffee cup? No problem; I’ll just make another one!).

    History

    3-dimensional printer creating object made of plastic

    Back in the late 1980s, single-production industrial prototyping was going from drawing board to reality. The first patent was issued in 1986 for the stereolithography apparatus (SLA), with the first commercial

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  4. Chemical Compatibility Chart — Plastics

    This chart is intended as a general guide for various materials and chemicals. It shows some of the materials used in Terra’s products and chemicals likely to be used with them. Testing is strongly recommended for extreme conditions of use, such as prolonged exposure or immersion, high temperatures and high concentrations. The acids, caustics and salts in this chart are assumed to be in solution. Materials may react differently to the pure substances (glacial acetic acid, for example). See Terra Universal's line of plastic Desiccators.

    Hazards Key
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    Hazards (Only the primary ones are shown. For example, chlorine is not shown as an asphyxiant

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  5. Chemical Compatibility Chart — Rubber and Synthetics

    This chart is intended as a general guide for various materials and chemicals. It shows some of the materials used in Terra’s products and chemicals likely to be used with them. Testing is strongly recommended for extreme conditions of use, such as prolonged exposure or immersion, high temperatures and high concentrations. The acids, caustics and salts in this chart are assumed to be in solution. Materials may react differently to the pure substances (glacial acetic acid, for example). See Terra Universal's line of Rubber & Synthetic Gloves.

    Hazards Key
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    Hazards (Only the p

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  6. Chemical Compatibility Chart — Metals

    This chart is intended as a general guide for various materials and chemicals. It shows some of the materials used in Terra’s products and chemicals likely to be used with them. Testing is strongly recommended for extreme conditions of use, such as prolonged exposure or immersion, high temperatures and high concentrations. The acids, caustics and salts in this chart are assumed to be in solution. Materials may react differently to the pure substances (glacial acetic acid, for example). See Terra Universal's line of metal Pass-Throughs.

    Hazards Key
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    Hazards (Only the primary ones are shown. For example, chlorine is not shown as

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  7. Cleanroom Design that Terra Recommends

    Terra Universal will certify its cleanrooms to guarantee “as built” compliance with cleanliness standards. What matters, though, is how the cleanroom performs in real world applications—in your application, with your personnel and processing equipment.

    Careful consideration of these operating conditions will help you select the configuration that meets your requirements and fits your budget!

    Cost vs. Coverage: Evaluating FFU Placement

    The cleanest modular cleanroom incorporates filter/fan units (FFUs) in every 2' x 4' (610 mm x 1219 mm) ceiling bay. This near-100% ceiling coverage provides a laminar flow of filtered air to quickly remove contaminants from the cleanroom, meeting ISO 3 or ISO 4 (Federal Standard 209(E) Class 1 or Class 10) environments (depending on the filter types selected, HEPA or ULPA).

    Of course, 100% ceiling coverage requires substantial investme

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  8. Static Dissipative PVC vs Acrylic

    Static Dissipative PVC vs Acrylic

    Hidden Costs of Acrylic Enclosures

    Static control arrow

    Compared to acrylic, static-dissipative PVC offers three benefits that reduce operating expenses and drive down overall ownership cost of a clean room, glove box, hood, desiccator, or other enclosure.

    Contamination Control

    Acrylic is a prolific static generator. The back-and-forth motion of wiping an acrylic surface creates positive and negative surface charges that attract and hold small particles.

    The resulting static cling makes it difficult to remove contaminants from the charged surfaces without the use of ionizing equipment or frequent cleaning with special anti-static solutions. Variations in the surface charges can lead to unpredictabl

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  9. Biological Safety Levels: BSL-1, BSL-2, BSL-3, BSL-4

    What is BSL?

    Biological Safety Level (BSL) is a biocontainment designation system with requirements intended to protect personnel from potentially harmful pathogenic exposure in a research or manufacturing environment.

    What are the differences among the BSL designations?

    The Centers for Disease Control (CDC) specifies four broad Biological Safety Levels, each of which corresponds to a level of exposure danger and a set of design features and operational protocol. Each increasing level builds on the previous level(s):

    • BSL-1: Required in the presence of microbes that do not consistently cause disease, such as E. coli. Work can be done on an open bench, and minimal Personnel Protective Equipment (PPE) is required. Doors separate the BSL-1 lab from the rest of the facility.
    • BSL-2: Required in th
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  10. Ultraviolet Disinfection: Crucial Link in the Sterilization Chain

    Ultraviolet Disinfection: Crucial Link in the Sterilization Chain

    Many manufacturers face the challenge of maintaining sterile products and processes. In most cases, there’s no one-size-fits-all solution. Highly effective sterilization technologies like ethylene oxide gas (EtO) or hydrogen peroxide vapor carry substantial risk and often come at a high cost. Frequent manual wipe-down with IPA or other cleaning agents is much less expensive but introduces difficulties related to operator training and process documentation and consistency. In many cases, the challenge amounts to managing multiple technologies that provide microbial control throughout widely differing processes—while minimizing costly disruptions for bioburden testing or decontamination routines.

    Fortunately, ultraviolet sanitizing technology provides a range of safe, cost-effective disinfection measures that simplify this task, whether employed as a stand-alone measure or as part of a broader

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