Cleanrooms

  1. Compare Cleanroom Door Features: Swing, Sliding, Automatic, Double Doors

    Compare Cleanroom Door Features: Swing, Sliding, Automatic, Double Doors

    Terra Universal’s cleanroom doors are designed for quick and easy installation into operating rooms, surgical suites, stick-built or modular cleanrooms. Designed for health care, pharmaceutical, and CGMP facilities, Terra’s cleanroom doors are easy-to-sterilize, maintain room pressure and resist common biocides and hospital-grade disinfectants.

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  2. Cost-Effective Environmental Monitoring for CGMP and GLP Requirements

    Cost-Effective Environmental Monitoring for CGMP and GLP Requirements

    Cleanroom monitoring systems are quickly becoming a feature expected for all modular cleanrooms, especially given the cGMP and GLP requirements for environmental reporting.

    Not every facility requires arrays of sensors for temperature, particulate, humidity, and pressure differential. The cost of a monitoring system is derived from several factors including the number and type of sensors, sampling rate, instrument sensitivity, and any value-added features such as WIFI, alarms, and automation of feedback controls. Determining the best option requires balancing a facility's needs today with the possibility of growth and expansion years down the line.

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  3. Cleanroom HVAC Design Principles - Best Practices and Common Mistakes

    Cleanroom HVAC Design Principles - Best Practices and Common Mistakes

    In the United States,  ISO 14644-1 is regarded as the gold standard for cleanroom construction. Cleanroom standards help define and measure expected outcomes but do not always provide a clear roadmap on how to achieve them. In parallel, GMP, IEST, USP, EU, and ASHRAE standards may provide more specific methodologies for air quality classification, testing equipment, and validation methods.

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  4. Cleanroom Power Distribution Units: A Simpler Method for Cleanroom Electrical Design

    Cleanroom Power Distribution Units: A Simpler Method for Cleanroom Electrical Design

    The cleanroom ceiling grid (shown above) is completely filled with HEPA-filtered fan units, lights, and ceiling tiles. A construction team installing or retrofitting this room – whether the room is stick-built or modular – will face major challenges. Each FFU and light must be individually hard-wired for operation; since the ceiling isn’t walkable, this task is costly, labor-intensive, and inefficient. A cleanroom maintenance crew will face similar obstacles in the event of room reconfiguration or relocation, or FFU change-out and filter replacement.

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  5. Cleanroom Fan Filter Features Comparison

    Cleanroom Fan Filter Features Comparison

    Compare cleanroom fan filter types and FFU features including airflow design, size, motors, construction, control systems, and compatible accessories.

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  6. ISO 14644 Types of Cleanrooms & Components | Comparison & Features Guide

    ISO 14644 Types of Cleanrooms & Components | Comparison & Features Guide

    Laminar flow air and positive pressure cleanroom design are ideal for non-hazardous, ultra-clean applications. Positive pressure mitigates dirt from entering the cleanroom when opening doors or pass-through chambers. Laminar airflow design ensures that air maintains a singular, uniform direction and velocity from intake to exhaust port. Terra's positive pressure cleanrooms include HEPA filtration systems capable of ISO Class 3 - ISO Class 8 air quality conditions. ULPA filtration units are available for the most sensitive ISO 3 - ISO 5 product applications including pharmaceutical compounding, semiconductor wafer processing, sterile packaging, and micro-nanofabrication.

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  7. Isolation vs. Containment Cleanrooms

    Isolation vs. Containment Cleanrooms

    The difference between isolation and containment typically identifies the type of airflow design within the environment. In practice, a cleanroom may require both positive and negative pressure systems within a single cleanroom suite.

    - An isolation cleanroom is a positive pressure room appropriate for ultra-clean processes, aseptic workflows, pharmaceutical compounding, and biologically sensitive applications.

    - A containment cleanroom is a negative or neutral pressure room that typically exhausts contaminated air to an outside area to prevent operational exposure to toxic, potent, or noxious substances.

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  8. Cleanroom Best Practices: 18 Rules For Cleaner Controlled Environments

    Cleanroom Best Practices: 18 Rules For Cleaner Controlled Environments

    Check out our list of Dos and Don’ts in a cleanroom, a summary of cleanroom best practices for making the controlled environment function at peak performance. These are good resources for new cleanroom operators or those unsure about what steps to take in a cleanroom environment.

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  9. FFU Costs for an Energy Efficient Cleanroom

    FFU Costs for an Energy Efficient Cleanroom

    A HEPA fan filter unit (FFU) is a crucial component of every cleanroom environment. Making the correct decision as to which type of FFU is the most appropriate for your application is not something to simply gloss over. There are two main categories of motorized fan filter units: permanent split capacitors (PSC) and electronically commutated motors (ECM). Both types of fan filter modules provide a perfunctory standard for any cleanroom, but differ by way of efficiency, durability and cost. PSC systems save you money upfront and are ideal for small, consistent projects. However, when considering longer endeavors, especially those with ever-changing circumstances, the ECM will pay for itself with energy savings. For instance, in California at an average of 14.47 cents per kilowatt hour, you would make the difference between the higher upfront costs of the ECM over the PSC bac

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  10. How Fan Filter Units Fight COVID-19

    How Fan Filter Units Fight COVID-19

    In addition to face masks, properly maintained air filters remain crucial in confined indoor spaces to help mitigate the spread of COVID-19 (SARS-CoV-2 virus). Both HEPA filters and ULPA filters reduce the number of microscopic particles in the air, which can keep air safe to breathe in places it’s needed most like hospitals, isolation rooms and crowded indoor areas.

    COVID-19 virus spreads through the air on respiratory droplets created from talking, coughing, sneezing, and even breathing. When these activities occur in a populated space with stale air, the likelihood of transmission can significantly increase, as COVID-19 has been proven to remain viable for at least 3 hours lingering in the air or on surfaces up to four meters away from its last host.

    Masks and social distancing significantly reduce the chance of the virus’s spread

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